Google Forms formulas tutorial: How to Use With Responses In Sheets

Google Forms formulas tutorial: How to Use With Responses In Sheets

People submit information using your Google Form, and the procedure is smooth. Within the Google Sheet used to store form replies, a new row appears. There is a “Timestamp” column in this row that displays the exact time the form was submitted. The sheet also features columns filled with the user’s replies, each nicely arranged, one per column.

However, Google Forms and Sheets are capable of much more. You have the ability to add formula fields that function automatically to your Forms sheet. Every time a new entry appears on your sheet thanks to the Google Form, these formulae activate. Here are some examples of practical uses:

  • Auto-Numbering for Streamlined Invoicing: If you use Google Forms for invoicing, you might want to think about developing an auto-number formula. Every form response is given a distinct ID that increases in number progressively thanks to this clever method. It’s a useful tool for keeping your billing process organized.
  • Smart Calculations for Customer Orders: Create a formula in Google Sheets that determines the total amount depending on the quantity entered in the form, the nation (taking into account different tax rates), and the choice of the item. Customer order forms benefit especially from this.
  • Easy Room Rent Calculations: For hotel reservation forms, make things easier by using a formula that computes room rent for you. It saves you time and effort by taking into consideration the check-in and check-out dates that the consumer provided in the Google Form.
  • Quick Calculation of Quiz Scores: Teachers can speed up quiz grading. You speed up the review process by automatically giving ratings based on matching the numbers supplied in the form with the appropriate responses.
  • Effective Multiple Submission Tracking: When users submit a form more than once, a formula might be your ally. It quickly determines how many entries in total a user has submitted, guaranteeing proper record-keeping.

By incorporating these formula-driven improvements, you may improve your use of Google Forms and Sheets and simplify data processing and maintenance.

Google Forms formulas tutorial: How to Use With Responses In Sheets

Google Sheets Formulas for Google Forms:

You’ll learn how to master the art of adding formulae to Google Sheets and connecting them with your Google Forms in this simple lesson. These formulae do their magic, automatically calculating the numbers when fresh replies are received.

Let’s put this to the test in order to fully appreciate its impact. Navigate to this Google Sheet after opening this Google Form and responding. Your response will be there, in a new row, with columns F through K tastefully filled in by these same formulas.

Keep an eye on Google Sheets’ ArrayFormula function as we go into examples. While the FILTER function can be used in some situations, we’ll mostly rely on ArrayFormula’s strength to streamline our procedures.

Auto-Number Form Responses with a Unique ID:

The procedures below may be used to create an auto-incrementing “Invoice ID” in your Google Sheet for form submissions:

  • Start a Google Sheet: Access the Google Sheet that contains the form submissions you made.
  • Pick a Column That Is Vacant: The first empty column where you wish to create the “Invoice ID” should be chosen.
  • Paste the Formula: copying the formula The following formula should be copied and pasted into the first row of the selected empty column:
=ArrayFormula(
  IFS(
    ROW(A:A)=1, "Invoice ID",
    LEN(A:A)=0, IFERROR(1/0),
    LEN(A:A)>0, LEFT(CONCAT(REPT("0",5), ROW(A:A) -1),6)
  )
)

The ROW() function is used in this formula to determine which row represents the current answer. It designates the column as “Invoice ID” for the very first row, which typically contains a Timestamp. The invoice ID is automatically generated for next rows depending on the row number. These IDs will be shown as 00001, 00002, etc.

Having fun with automation is it! This formula will automatically populate all succeeding rows if it is placed in the first row of the column you have selected, easing the process of creating invoices.

The IFERROR function makes sure that it will return a null result in the event of any failures. This straightforward configuration improves the administration and structure of your data.

Date Calculation Formula for Google Forms:

Google Sheets and Forms make it simple to adjust hotel room pricing in response to changing seasons. The check-in and check-out dates are two very important date fields that you have. A different table in your Google Sheet keeps track of room rent every month to account for varying prices.

Google Forms formulas tutorial: How to Use With Responses In Sheets

Check-in dates are recorded in column C, while check-out dates are recorded in column D. Use the following formula to simplify calculating room rent:

=ArrayFormula(
    IF(ROW(A:A) = 1,
      "Room Rent",
      IF(NOT(ISBLANK(A:A)),
       (D:D - C:C) *
       VLOOKUP(MONTH(D:D), 'Room Rates'!$B$2:$C$13,2, TRUE),
       ""
      )
   )
)

In order to retrieve hotel prices depending on the supplied trip date in the form response, this formula uses VLOOKUP. The room rent is then determined by multiplying the rate by the length of the stay.

You may also use the IFS function for a more dynamic strategy:

=ArrayFormula(
    IF(ROW(A:A) = 1,
        "Room Rent",
        IFS(ISBLANK(C:C), "",
           MONTH(C:C) < 2, 299,
           MONTH(C:C) < 5, 499,
           MONTH(C:C) < 9, 699,
           TRUE, 199
        )
    )
)

This variant of the method gives you flexibility in managing seasonal changes by allocating various rates based on the check-in month.

Calculate Tax Amount Based on Invoice Value:

As an alternative to utilizing IF functions, we use the FILTER function to make the formula simpler. The only catch is that you must designate the column title in row #1 and paste the formulae in row #2 (ensuring that at least one form answer is present for it to work).

=ArrayFormula(FILTER(E2:E, E2:E<>"")*1.35)

The invoice value is easily taxed at 35% using this calculation. As seen in the screenshot, put it in row #2 of the column marked “Tax Amount.”

Assign Quiz Scores in Google Forms:

Some questions inside Google Forms need accuracy. Consider the traditional “Big Apple” question, to which students may respond “New York,” “New York City,” or just “NYC.” Giving the right answer 10 points is a difficulty for the instructor.

Use this clever formula:

=ArrayFormula(
    IF(ROW(A:A) = 1,
      "Quiz Score",
      IFS(
        ISBLANK(A:A), "",
        REGEXMATCH(LOWER({B:B}), "new\s?york"), 10,
        {B:B} = "NYC", 10,
        TRUE, 0
      )
    )
)

The IFS function, which functions like a ‘IF-THEN’ statement in programming, is used in this case. We cleverly match ‘New York,’ ‘New York City,’ and ‘newyork’ all at once using REGEXMATCH with regular expressions.

The IFS function is wonderful in that it returns a NA if none of the requirements are satisfied. In order to guarantee that a score of 0 is always returned when none of the preceding requirements are met, we add a TRUE check at the conclusion. A fantastic approach to quiz scoring!

Extract the First Name of the Form Respondent:

When the whole name field on your form is present, Google Sheets can magically extract just the first name for customized email correspondence.

Look at this clever formula:

=ArrayFormula(
  IFS(
    ROW(A:A)=1, "First Name",
    LEN(A:A)=0, IFERROR(1/0),
    LEN(A:A)>0, PROPER(REGEXEXTRACT(B:B, "^[^\s+]+"))
  )
)

To extract the text from the name field before the first space, this formula uses the RegexExtract method. Additionally, it’s considerate to use the PROPER function to guarantee that the initial letter of the user’s name is capitalized even if they submitted it in lowercase. a clever method for using email to establish individualized interactions.

Find Duplicate Google Form Submissions:

When you’re gathering email addresses, managing duplicate submissions in Google Forms is a breeze. Here’s an efficient formula:

=ArrayFormula(
  IFS(
    ROW(A:A)=1, "Is Duplicate Entry?",
    LEN(A:A)=0, IFERROR(1/0),
    LEN(A:A)>0, IF(COUNTIF(B:B, B:B) > 1, "YES", "")
  )
)

This formula uses COUNTIF to quickly identify duplicate submissions in your response spreadsheet, with Column B serving as a storage area for form respondents’ email addresses. Use conditional formatting to show possible duplication as a visual assistance.

Email Form Responses with AutoFill Values:

Next, let’s talk about using Document Studio to automate email replies. Google Sheets fills in form fields automatically before Document Studio takes over to send emails. With this thorough method, you may include computed data as well as original form replies in the resulting PDF file. Utilize these effective Google Forms and Sheets techniques to streamline your productivity.

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